Essay- Spring Equinox

The beginning of astronomical (and in come climates, meteorological) Spring represents a critical turning point in the agricultural cycle. Livestock reproduction is in full swing, milk is now more plentiful, and the disappearance of snow and ice mean that the earth is now accessible and warm enough to prepare for the sowing season.

Outside the domestic sphere, animal and plant life are also in the midst of a dramatic change. Wild animals have already (or will soon) produce their young, and plants are beginning to bud and bloom. Longer days and warmer weather have arrived or will very soon, and that means that the dangers of winter have nearly passed. The Spring Feast marks the beginning of a focus on fertility and new life.

Across the spectrum of Indo-European cultures, celebrations of the Spring Equinox seem to vary in importance. The Ancient Greeks celebrated the God Dionysus by opening new jars of wine, the Romans observed several feast days that tend to focus on vegetation deities, and the Celts mark the equinox through their mythological cycle. There is some evidence that the Norse celebrated the spring equinox; such an observance makes sense considering the importance (and dramatic nature) of the solar cycle among the Scandinavian cultures.

I lived most of my life in the American South, where the weather for the spring equinox varied from very warm to cool, but you could more or less count on the trees already beginning to bud, noticeably longer days, and signs of animal life all around. My experience of Spring in the South has heavily shaped my own practice, and even if the time of fertility and warmth are not as pronounced here in the Midwest, the psychological effect of the season remain intact.

Feasting has always been my favorite part of the Spring Equinox, whether that means a big Easter dinners with my family or having a meal with my fellow Neopagans. From a ritual perspective, my devotional practice aligns well with the Norse celebration of the solar cycle (or at least it aligns well with what has been speculated about it) and the Roman preoccupation with vegetation deities. Above all, there is a distinct notion of awakening, and that is always my guiding principle.

Forest Bathing

I had to get out of the city on Saturday. I needed some tree time, to hear the critters stirring, and not much else. Fortunately, the weather was cooperative.

Loving the first pick of the oak tree at the edge of the corn field.

Fallow time.

Essay – Fall Feast

The last of the harvest festivals marks the end (or beginning) of the agricultural year and the turning point from which a period of fertility, growth, and abundance gives way to a fallow time of rest, darkness, and regeneration. The festival is most commonly referred to as Samhain, and the mythology, lore, and customs most commonly associated with the season and its secular counterpart, Halloween, are derived from Celtic and Germanic Pagan traditions.

For most Neopagans, the Fall Feast is a fire festival which marks the end of summer and preparations for the perilous winter to come. In earlier agrarian societies, harvests were stored and animals are slaughtered in order to ensure survival through the long, cold season. Of course these cycles are still repeated, but 21st century Neopagans such as myself are no longer as spiritually connected the agricultural processes or animal husbandry which lie at the heart of the feast.

In the spiritual sense, the Fall Feast is generally celebrated by Neopagans as the time when the division between life and death is least pronounced. Put another way, the Fall Feast brings into sharp relief the frail nature of life and its dependence on the cycles of life and death. Animals must be slaughtered for food, vegetation must succumb to the cold in order to regenerate, and the question of whether or not one will survive the coming winter surfaces.

The idea that the spiritual world or realm of the dead is accessible to the living at this time derives from Celtic tradition, and this concept has heavily influenced spiritual and secular celebrations of the feast. Ancestor worship, divination, and magic are common themes for this High Day. Masking, revelry, and fear of the restless dead are also elements of the broader celebration.

A direct and commensurate celebration to the Fall Feast of the Celtic and Germanic traditions is elusive within Hellenic Paganism. The agricultural cycles of the Mediterranean do not align closely to those of cultures in the more northern or western regions of Europe, so Hellenic Druids are forced to make a choice: recreate (as best we can) the culturally-appropriate festivals of Thesmophoria or perhaps the Eleusinian Mysteries (of which we know virtually nothing), or adapt the practices of the Ancient Greeks to the rubrics of the more widely-celebrated Fall Feast. I choose the latter option.

In my practice, the Fall Feast occurs within an agricultural cycle and climate similar to that of Northern and Western Europe. By the end of October, the frosts have arrived, the fields are harvested, and meteorological winter has begun.  The days are noticeabley shorter, and it is nearly dark by the time I arrive home from work everyday at 5PM. This trend of decreasing sunlight is dramatic this far north, and it has a pronounced effect on my mood. I know that it will be almost two months before the light begins to increase, and I settle into a habit of sleeping longer and spending much more time indoors.

For my Fall Feast, I honor Demeter, the Goddess of grains, fruits, and cultivated vegetation, as well the myth of Kore/Persephone and Hades, which for the ancient Greeks explained the seasonal change from summer into winter. I embrace the dying of one year and the rest that must come before the commencement of the next. I find it natural and fitting to also celebrate my ancestors at this time. I also lean into the magical and divinatory significance of the season because this is a liminal time and the hinge upon which the agricultural season changes.

 

 

Harvest Ritual, Greek Pantheon- Preface

Even as I type the name of this blog post, I am aware of the conundrum that occurs by referring to my rite as “Samhain” when I, in fact, am a practicing Druid who works within the Hellenic tradition. During the early stages of my Druid practice, this kind of thing troubled me. Not as much these days, and here’s why:

ADF Druidry incorporates all Indo-European pantheons and traditions. Our Druidry, as I embrace it, is more focused on the fundamental religious and magical systems of the IE peoples than on any single cultural reconstructionist expression. Other Druid groups exclusively emphasize Celtic traditions (by which they often mean the Insular Celtic traditions of the British Isles) and others focus on Germanic traditions.

The fact that I choose to work within the Hellenic pagan tradition does not negate my Druidic practice. Although there are important differences between the Celtic traditions and the Greek (to say nothing of the differences in the cultures themselves) there are also fundamental similarities. It is these shared concepts and practices, expressed uniquely in each culture, upon which I focus on in my solitary rituals.

I should also point out that just because I connect to Druidry through the Hellenic culture, does not mean that I don’t also connect to Druidry through other cultures as well. Part of the reason that I was drawn to ADF is because of our emphasis on learning, particularly when it comes to understanding other cultures and hearth traditions. After all, the history of Pre-Indo-European peoples is long and complex, and there were many opportunities for different groups to interact with and influence each other.

One of the most liberating qualities of Neopaganism for me is that I don’t have to be a fundamentalist. I’m just as happy to celebrate your traditions and honor your gods as I am my own. And with that, let’s get on with it.